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Domestic politics loomed large for U.S. officials in Lima

LIMA, Peru -- U.S. officials fought hard in the U.N. climate talks that ended here yesterday for a deal that would play well with the American public.

The key theme for the Americans: All countries -- developed and developing -- are sharing the burden of cutting emissions of heat-trapping gases. The U.S. delegation insisted it wouldn't accept a deal that reserves binding emission-reduction responsibilities for countries that were developed nations in 1992 -- when the Kyoto Protocol setting international emission targets was drafted.

NEGOTIATIONS:

The framework for a new climate treaty had a difficult birth; it faces more stress next year

LIMA, Peru -- They fought about money, categories and assessments. They skirmished over scopes and road maps and timetables. But the true battle consuming leaders from 198 governments at a U.N. global warming conference that concluded yesterday after two weeks of negotiations and 32 hours of overtime debating was really about just one thing: balancing responsibilities between poor, rich and richer nations.

But the true battle consuming leaders from 198 governments at a U.N. global warming conference that concluded yesterday after two weeks of negotiations and 32 hours of overtime debating was really about just one thing: balancing responsibilities between poor, rich and richer nations.

NEGOTIATIONS:

After 30 hours of overtime haggling, diplomats agree on a new approach to deal with climate change

LIMA, Peru -- A battle over how the world will tackle climate change dragged into more than 30 hours of overtime ending early today with a thin agreement that puts governments on a path to a new global warming accord in 2015 but does little to ensure it is ambitious enough to avoid the most dangerous impacts.

As a rare rainfall enveloped the U.N. tent city built for the negotiations, Peruvian President of the 20th U.N. Conference of the Parties Manuel Pulgar Vidal declared the hard-fought decision approved just before 2 a.m., striking the gavel to whoops and extended applause. But while diplomats cheered the text's approval as a key step in keeping countries on track for signing a new global deal in Paris next year, environmental activists said the so-called Lima Call for Climate Action actually does nothing to ensure countries put forward strong carbon-cutting targets.

NEGOTIATIONS:

Slow business of removing 'roadblocks' from a potentially different climate treaty continues with China's help

LIMA, Peru -- Language the United States and China struck last month to iron out their decades-long dispute over which countries should act first to tackle climate change could serve as a model for the gridlocked international negotiations, China's top climate change official said yesterday.

In an interview with ClimateWire during a lull in stagnated negotiations here last night, National Development and Reform Commission Vice Chairman Xie Zhenhua said the November announcement that saw President Obama pledge to slash U.S. emissions economywide by 2025 and President Xi Jinping declare that China will peak emissions by 2030 "reflects the differentiation between the countries."

About this report

E&E tracks work on a post-Kyoto agreement for curbing emissions of heat-trapping gases.

Negotiations

Major Economies

China, India

Developing Countries