SCIENCE

Blowing past climate goals could turn wind turbines

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3:08 PM

OIL AND GAS

30 years later, Exxon Valdez’s legacy still gushes

When the Exxon Valdez oil tanker ran aground in March 1989 in Alaska’s Prince William Sound, it released a record-setting 11 million gallons of crude oil into a uniquely vulnerable environment, killing thousands of birds and animals and marring 1,300 miles of pristine coastline for decades. Thirty years later, its legacy can be seen across the oil and gas industry and in responses to other environmental disasters.

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3:08 PM

OIL AND GAS

30 years later, Exxon Valdez’s legacy still gushes

When the Exxon Valdez oil tanker ran aground in March 1989 in Alaska’s Prince William Sound, it released a record-setting 11 million gallons of crude oil into a uniquely vulnerable environment, killing thousands of birds and animals and marring 1,300 miles of pristine coastline for decades. Thirty years later, its legacy can be seen across the oil and gas industry and in responses to other environmental disasters.