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E&E reporters offer experienced insight and context for energy and environmental news. While they're wonks on their beats, our reporters explain issues clearly so anyone can understand these important matters.

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This Week's Hot Topics

INSIDE THE WHITE HOUSE ENERGY PLANS

What: An inside look at the Trump Administration's plans on energy and climate from the president's former top adviser, David Banks, who was forced to exit after failing to gain security clearance.

Who: Hannah Northey | READ STORY >>>

PUERTO RICO BY THE NUMBERS

What: Five months ago this week, Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico, leading to the worst blackout in American history and a costly, complicated attempt to rebuild its electric grid. How is that effort going? According to data compiled by E&E News, there is much left to do. While most have electricity, it is unclear how much longer those in the dark will have to wait.

Who: David Ferris | READ STORY >>>

TRUMP'S TOP SCIENCE ADVISER IS A 31-YR-OLD POLI-SCI MAJOR

What: A job that's been held by some of the nation's top scientists is now occupied by a 31-year-old politics major from Princeton University. And that doesn't look to change soon.

Who: Scott Waldman | READ STORY >>>

PRUITT'S FIRST-CLASS ACT

What: EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt has been flying around the country first-class for "security" reasons, which has come under scrutiny. Reactions are mixed on Capitol Hill but it has prompted the EPA chief to lay low for a bit.

Who: Kevin Bogardus | READ STORY >>>

HIDDEN GEMS

STATE ACTION ON CLIMATE STALLS

What: Climate hawks shifted their focus from Washington, D.C., to state capitals in the wake of President Trump's 2016 victory, hoping state lawmakers might usher in the types of carbon reduction strategies the federal government could not. But more than a year later, state climate action remains stuck in neutral, and the prospects for victory in 2018 remain far from certain.

Who: Benjamin Storrow | READ STORY >>>

INSIDE LOOK

Check out E&E News' podcast "Climate Lede" LISTEN NOW >>>