This E&E Interactive Project requires a modern browser with Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) support.

Draft rule reduction: 38.3% (459 lbs CO2 / MWh)

Editor's note: The following summary represents state and utility stances after the Supreme Court stayed the Clean Power Plan in February 2016.

Florida’s Department of Environmental Protection is assessing the implications of the Supreme Court stay on the Clean Power Plan, according to spokeswoman Dee Ann Miller.

Florida was among 27 states that joined legal challenges to the rule. The state must cut its power-sector carbon emissions rate 25 percent by 2030, a significant difference from its original target of 38 percent.

Florida's largest electric utility, Florida Power & Light Co., wants the Sunshine State to comply with U.S. EPA's Clean Power Plan by requiring power plants to reach an average rate of emissions.

"Because we are in a growth state and we are a growth utility, FPL supports Florida implementing a rate-based program," FPL spokeswoman Sarah Gatewood said (EnergyWire, Dec. 16, 2015).

Florida's Department of Environmental Protection criticized the draft rule for making the state's target so stringent compared with other states. DEP called the goal "arbitrary." The agency asked EPA to allow nuclear uprates that increase power output to count toward compliance, which would help Florida.

DEP also asked that alternative fuels, such as waste-to-energy facilities, be considered as low-carbon resources.

The technical staff of the Florida Public Service Commission provided a similar response. In comments to EPA, the staff asked that the final rule not bypass the PSC's jurisdiction and take into consideration previous efforts to reduce carbon emissions.

The PSC also asked that interim goals, now between 2022 and 2030, not be mandatory. EPA's final rule requires states to meet interim goals but has made efforts to ease the trajectory.

FPL stands out as one of the electric companies that said they support the Clean Power Plan's overall goal to reduce carbon emissions and encourage investments in clean energy.

FPL, like the rest of Florida, gets the bulk of its electricity from natural gas and is making plans to increase that amount. FPL also gets 23 percent of its electricity from emissions-free nuclear.

Last updated on February 24, 2016 at 6:14 PM

For questions or comments about E&E’s Power Plan Hub or related stories, please email PowerPlanHub@eenews.net.

Latest Stories and Videos

CAMPAIGN 2016

5 state races to watch on election night

OK, so you're going to be anxiously awaiting the returns in the presidential race tonight. But your obsessive Twitter checking, website refreshing and TV station switching might produce few results in the early hours, especially if polls are correct in predicting a tightening race between presidential contenders Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. So what is a politics junkie to do in the meantime?

Regulation

Electric cooperative CEOs meet with McCarthy on Power Plan concerns

As pressure grows for U.S. EPA to change its draft Clean Power Plan proposal, a group of electric cooperative CEOs met with EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy this week to discuss their concerns with the current plan. During today's OnPoint, Duane Highley, CEO of Arkansas Electric Cooperative, and Lisa Johnson, CEO and general manager of Seminole Electric Cooperative, discuss the details of their meeting yesterday with McCarthy. Johnson also talks about her upcoming testimony before a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on the impact of the Clean Power Plan on electric co-ops.

CLIMATE

NARUC President Edgar talks regulator concerns on EPA Clean Power Plan

How are the country's utility regulators responding to the pending finalization of U.S. EPA's Clean Power Plan? During today's OnPoint, from the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners' winter meetings, Lisa Edgar, president of NARUC and a commissioner on the Florida Public Service Commission, discusses her strategy for leading NARUC during one of the most dynamic times for utility regulators. She talks about how her power plan concerns as a Florida commissioner are shaping her role as NARUC president and explains why she believes a regional approach would have limited success in her state.

Climate

NARUC President Edgar talks regulator concerns on EPA Clean Power Plan

How are the country's utility regulators responding to the pending finalization of U.S. EPA's Clean Power Plan? During today's OnPoint, from the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners' winter meetings, Lisa Edgar, president of NARUC and a commissioner on the Florida Public Service Commission, discusses her strategy for leading NARUC during one of the most dynamic times for utility regulators. She talks about how her power plan concerns as a Florida commissioner are shaping her role as NARUC president and explains why she believes a regional approach would have limited success in her state.

Documents

Public Comments

Advertisement