SPOTLIGHT

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SECURITY

The inside story of the world's most dangerous malware

On Aug. 4, 2017, at 7:43 p.m., two emergency shutdown systems sprang into action as darkness settled over the sprawling refinery along Saudi Arabia's Red Sea coast.

The systems brought part of the Petro Rabigh complex offline in a last-gasp effort to prevent a gas release and deadly explosion. But as safety devices took extraordinary steps, control room engineers working the weekend shift spotted nothing out of the ordinary, either on their computer screens or out on the plant floor.

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WHITE HOUSE

Energy execs spend big at Trump hotel 'Disneyland'

The Trump International Hotel rolled out the red carpet last summer for the two coal companies that have done the most to curry favor with the owner of the Washington, D.C., luxury destination: President Trump.

Murray Energy Corp. CEO Bob Murray and Heath Lovell, a top spokesman for magnate Joe Craft's Alliance Resource Partners LP, were "VIP Arrivals" for one-night stays on June 20, 2018, according to a list obtained by The Washington Post.

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YELLOWSTONE

'The Killing Fields': Bison come to roam. Then they die

GARDINER, Mont. —- In the summertime, Sue Oliver can peer out her dining room window to see the majesty of snow-covered Electric Peak just across the bumpy gravel road in front of her retirement home along the Yellowstone River.

In the winter, when the hunters come, she'd just as soon close the curtains to avoid a different scene: the routine slaughtering of hundreds of bison. It happens each year at Beattie Gulch, a narrow strip of unoccupied federal land next to the park's northern border, just a stone's throw from Oliver's house.

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MORE STORIES

CLEAN WATER ACT

A hunter's view: No such thing as an isolated wetland

BURAS, La. — When wetlands in the Upper Midwest are drained for agriculture, Ryan Lambert's hunting and fishing lodge takes a beating — even though it's a thousand miles away in coastal Louisiana. "The farmers say draining doesn't affect anything because 'it's not connected.'" he says. "It's not connected? Shoot! Everything north has to come south. That's the way it works." Looming changes to federal Clean Water Act protections might mean more trouble for Lambert and other sportsmen.

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