SPORTS

Hello baseball season; goodbye Louisville Slugger

When St. Louis Cardinals third baseman Matt Carpenter picked up a bat for the 2016 baseball season opener Sunday against the Pittsburgh Pirates, he selected one made of maple. These days, maple is the bat material of choice for most pros. But scientists say that if ballplayers like Carpenter ever want to go back to traditional ash bats, they might not have the chance. The supply of ash in the United States is under threat, and with it, the iconic Louisville Slugger. The culprit: an invasive beetle called the emerald ash borer.

SPORTS

Is it cool to be 'green' at sports stadiums? Yes, but it goes way beyond that

Every Sunday during football season, the Philadelphia Eagles throw the biggest party in town, says Norman Vossschulte, the team's director of guest experience. But parties, especially ones with more than 68,000 guests, cost a lot of money and create a lot of trash. So in 2004, the team's senior leadership looked at the stadium's balance sheet and identified two areas where costs were huge -- energy and waste -- and drummed up a plan for improvement.

 

About this report

An occasional series on the impact that rising temperatures are having on some of the world's most popular sports.

Advertisement

SPORTS

As ice turns to slush, experts predict 'foreseeable end' to outdoor hockey in Canada

Scott Krysa picked up his first hockey stick at age 5. Now 26, the current Toronto resident still hits the ice three times a week, twice as part of an organized amateur hockey league and once at one of the city's 52 outdoor rinks. Hockey, he said, is part of Canadians' blood: "Kids in Canada, we play hockey on the street, in the house, really anywhere." But as Canada's winter temperatures have risen more than 4.5 degrees Fahrenheit between 1951 and 2005, nearly three times the global average, these dreams are melting, rapidly.

SPORTS

How the surfing business could be a wipeout for an iconic Calif. town

In the late 1800s, three princes from Hawaii fashioned some surfboards from redwood trees and began teaching the first Californians to surf, or so the legend goes. The jury is still out on how a changing climate will affect surfing around the world -- for some places such as eastern Australia, the big waves are expected to gradually weaken -- but for California's Monterey Bay, new modeling by the U.S. Geological Survey shows waves getting even bigger, but then falling flat as sea levels rise.

SPORTS

In a country of weather extremes, could climate change defeat sports-mad Australians?

At 12 years old, Alex Rance began playing Australian rules football. Six years later, he was drafted to the Richmond Tigers, a professional team based in Melbourne. Outdoor sports has been Rance's life, and, naturally, he knew weather has played a role, but it wasn't until he came home from practice one day and began complaining about the extreme heat and extreme rains that his sister set him straight.

Advertisement