STORIES IN THIS SERIES

ENERGY STORAGE

What tips the scales in America's favor

PART FOUR:
At a retired tobacco plant in North Carolina, a company called Alevo offers a weighty argument for why an energy storage industry could flourish right here in America.

Its production line assembles the GridBank, a box the size of a shipping container intended to help utilities manage output from wind or solar farms, or perform many other tasks for which electrical storage can be useful. It holds enough lithium-ion batteries to power 1,000 typical homes for an hour and weighs 90,000 pounds — as much as 20 Tesla Model S sedans.

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TECHNOLOGY

Where the energy storage industry is happening now

PART THREE:
The United States would seem a shoo-in to dominate the emerging energy storage industry. Domestic companies already make batteries for every possible use, from medical implants to soldiers' kits to warehouse forklifts to massive systems that can absorb the output from solar farms.

But it is a disjointed effort that isn't prepared to seize two mammoth markets that are poised to take off in the next decade: electric vehicles and "stationary" storage for buildings and the electric grid.

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TECHNOLOGY

Energy storage is America's industry to lose

PART ONE:
Julie Blunden is a former solar executive who now focuses her analytical ability on energy storage. When she sits down with an iced tea to run the numbers, they fill her with a sense of urgency.

She sees a market that is strapping on its boots for a steep and inexorable climb. Blunden and a growing number of experts believe that energy storage will be worth tens of billions of dollars in revenue within a decade, regardless of what the Trump administration does to harm or help.

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